How do you negotiate with “difficult” people?

office-interiorI suspect no one considers themselves to be “difficult” so we are perhaps talking about people with strong opinions which they consider correct.  I would always advocate attempting negotiation or mediation rather than simply assuming an adversarial approach and heading to Court.  It always helps as a first step to actually take a step back and get some perspective on the situation.  It is easy to be so convinced of your own position that you do not look at the alternatives which might have some unforeseen benefits.

As we all know, under stress even reasonable people can become angry, intractable and entrenched in their view.  Anger and hostility may also hide fear and mistrust, confusion and distress.  You need to deal with not only that person’s behaviour but your reaction to it which can easily perpetuate the very behaviour you would like to stop.  If you react angrily, negotiation may become impossible.

The aim is to move from face-to-face confrontation to side-by-side problem solving – it is always worth a try.  Working together to seek solutions rather than having an angry confrontation which goes nowhere.

“Speak when you are angry and you will make the best speech you will ever regret”. Ambrose Bierce

Sometimes people may try to wind you up – if you succumb to anger you stop thinking clearly and by reacting you become part of the problem.  It is important not to react to provocation or try to provoke a reaction! Sometimes the most affective negotiation is accomplished by saying nothing.

Sometimes emotional reactions indicate a need for recognition of pain or distress or hurt.  We all have a deep need for recognition, and satisfying that need can help create a climate for agreement.  Acknowledging the other’s point of view does not mean that you necessary agree with it.  It means that you accept it as one valid point of view amongst others, but it sends a conciliatory message.  Agree wherever you can.  It is possible to agree without conceding.

Saying “Yes, you have a point there” or “Yes, I agree with you” always goes down well.

As well as using yes a lot use “we” and try and find out what each party really wants as there may be more mutual ground than first thought.  It is important too that no one loses face and the other acknowledges that.  The bottom line is that it is better for people to negotiate an agreement, to engage in mediation or have discussions, to reach their own solution rather than getting into any sort of Court argument with a decision imposed by a third party.

For more information or to discuss further please contact Nicky Gough on 07711 527968 or email info@cotswoldmediation.com.

See also “Getting Past No” by William Ury.

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