Who looks after the children?

children walking through wheat fieldRecent statistics have revealed that not only in most families do both parents work, full or part time, but also more surprising the increasing number of families where the woman is the main breadwinner.  We should not be surprised though it should perhaps lead us to question some other perceptions about who is or should be looking after the children. When parents separate there is often a fear on the part of fathers that they will in some way “lose their children”, that if they go to Court the odds are stacked against them because the perception is that children always stay with their mothers. But Judges do actually live in the real world, they and all the Court staff are part of the working population where it is normal for both parents to be juggling work and childcare.  So when parents separate it is only logical that Courts will see that men and women may both work and both want to see their children.  We have plenty of female Judges who may have a stay at home partner looking after their children.  There really is no longer any automatic prejudice in favour of mothers except in the case of very small babies who may be physically dependant on their mother.  It still happens though that the person, often the mother, who has the major child caring role considers that contact is their gift to dispense with as they decide.  The Court's view is that what is most important is what is in the child’s best interests.  Not what either parent may want. If we focus on what is in the best interests of the children, it is of course that the parents should not go to Court, should not argue about childcare but should resolve their differences through negotiation and compromise.  This itself conveys valuable lessons to the children. Fathers are often very fearful about losing contact which can make them over aggressive, anxious that they will lose their children forever.  Perhaps if they were more reassured that the Court’s attitude is very much that children should spend time with both parents, a lot of the hostility could be avoided. Historically children were very much the man’s property and women had no rights at all on separation or divorce.  Then the approach was that children always stayed with their mother,  possibly we now have a more sensible view which looks at the practical realities of daily life, the needs of the children and the importance of avoiding conflict. For more information or to discuss further please contact Nicky Gough on 07711 527968 or email info@cotswoldmediation.com.
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Changes in Family Law – a new dedicated Family Court

The Crime and Courts Act 2013 introduced the concept of a single Family Court, which will deal only with family matters.  This, it is anticipated, will be operational from April 2014.  The Family Court will deal with all family cases with the exception of two areas of law: those involving the jurisdiction of the High Court - i.e. serious and unusual matters such as Wardship - and International cases. Three children in woodsThe Family Court will include all levels of Judge and there will not be the transfer between Magistrates and County Court as there is at the moment which should enable cases to be heard quicker and in less time. As there are various levels of Judges it is important to ensure that each case is allocated to the correct level which is hoped will be achieved by a specific team when cases are submitted.  Court staff have been assured that there will be no Court closures or redundancies as a result of this single Family Court – we shall see! The big change after the reduction of the availability of Legal Aid in April is of course the number of people who are making applications in person rather than using a Solicitor or Barrister.  As they are often not aware of the procedure, cases can take longer and Judges are being given specific training on how to deal with litigants in person.   The new Family Court is presumably to make the whole process easier for everyone to use. Other key changes being introduced are: -
  1. Attendance at a MIAM (Mediation Information Assessment Meeting) will be a  prerequisite before making an application to the Court (unless there are specified exemptions such as domestic violence).  This is a meeting before a Mediator who gives both parties (not necessarily together) information about the options available to them and encourages Mediation rather than an application to the Court.
  2. There is to be a presumption that both parents should be involved in the life of the child and that this will be in the child’s best interests – unless of course there is an exception indicating one parent’s unsuitability.
  3. Contact and Residence Orders are to go - they will be replaced by “Child Arrangement Orders” specifying with whom a child is to live with, spend time with or otherwise have contact with, and when they are to do so.
The most important change is of course the introduction of a single Family Court which it is hoped and intended will speed up the hearing of children proceedings which should of course be in everyone’s interest. For more information or to discuss further please contact Nicky Gough on 07711 527968 or email info@cotswoldmediation.com.
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